The Mother of Parliaments Harry Graham

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The Mother of Parliaments  by  Harry Graham

The Mother of Parliaments by Harry Graham
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The Mother of Parliaments by Harry Graham, Author of “A Group of Scottish Women”1911CONTENTSDedicationPrefaceChapter 1. Parliament and PartyChapter 2. The House of LordsChapter 3. The House of CommonsChapter 4. The Palace of WestminsterChapter 5. HisMoreThe Mother of Parliaments by Harry Graham, Author of “A Group of Scottish Women”1911CONTENTSDedicationPrefaceChapter 1.

Parliament and PartyChapter 2. The House of LordsChapter 3. The House of CommonsChapter 4. The Palace of WestminsterChapter 5. His Majesty’s ServantsChapter 6. The Lord ChancellorChapter 7. The SpeakerChapter 8. The Opening of ParliamentChapter 9. Rules of DebateChapter 10. Parliamentary Privilege and PunishmentChapter 11. Parliamentary Dress and DeportmentChapter 12. Parliamentary EloquenceChapter 13. Parliament at Work--(1)Chapter 14.

Parliament At Work (2)Chapter 15. Strangers in ParliamentChapter 16. Parliamentary ReportingPrefaceThe history of England’s Parliament is the history of the English people. To the latter it must consequently prove a source of never-failing interest. That it does so is clearly shown by the long list of writers who have sought and found inspiration in the subject. To add to their number may perhaps seem an unnecessary, even a superfluous, task. This volume may indeed be likened to that “Old Piece in a New Dress” to which Petyt compared his Lex Parliamentaria.

“These things, men will say, have been done before- the same Matter, and much the same Form, are to be found in other Writers, and this is but to obtrude upon the World a vain Repetition of other men’s observations.” But although the frank use of secondhand matter cannot in this case be denied, it is to be hoped that even the oldest and most threadbare material may be woven into a fresh pattern, suitable to modern taste.In these democratic days a seat in either House of Parliament is no longer the monopoly of a single privileged class: it lies within the reach of all who can afford the luxury of representing either themselves or their fellows at Westminster.

It is therefore only natural that the interest in parliamentary affairs should be more widely disseminated to-day than ever. It does not confine itself to actual or potential members of both Houses, but is to be found in the bosom of the humblest constituent, and even of that shadowy individual vaguely referred to as the Man in the Street. Though, however, the interest in Parliament is widespread, a knowledge of parliamentary forms, of the actual conduct of business in either House, of the working of the parliamentary machine, is less universal.At the present time the sources of information open to the student of parliamentary history may roughly be regarded as twofold.

For the earnest scholar, desirous of examining the basis and groundwork of the Constitution, the birth and growth of Parliament, the gradual extension and development of its power, its privileges and procedure, the writings of all the great English historians, and of such parliamentary experts as Hatsell, May, Palgrave, Sir William Anson, Sir Courtenay Ilbert and Professor Redlich, provide a rich mine of information. That more considerable section of the reading public which seeks to be entertained rather than instructed, can have its needs supplied by less technical but no less able parliamentary writers--Sir Henry W.

Lucy, Mr. T. P. O’Connor, Mr. MacDonagh--none of whom, as a rule, attempts to do more than touch lightly upon fundamental Constitutional questions.The idea of combining instruction with amusement is one from which every normal-minded being naturally shrinks: the attempt generally results in the failure either to inform or entertain.



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